Photo
spaceplasma:

Pan across the Tarantula Nebula

This star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy which neighbours the Milky Way. It is home to many extreme conditions including supernova remnants and the heaviest star ever found. The Tarantula Nebula is the most luminous nebula of its type in the local Universe.

Credit: NASA, ESA

spaceplasma:

Pan across the Tarantula Nebula

This star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy which neighbours the Milky Way. It is home to many extreme conditions including supernova remnants and the heaviest star ever found. The Tarantula Nebula is the most luminous nebula of its type in the local Universe.

Credit: NASA, ESA

(via coolsciencegifs)

Source: spaceplasma
Photo Set

luxhysteria:

Jupiter’s great red spot. A hurricane three times the size of our whole planet that’s been raging for centuries.

(via coolsciencegifs)

Source: luxhysteria
Photo
benjoyment:

40 seconds of a storm from earlier this week.

benjoyment:

40 seconds of a storm from earlier this week.

(via coolsciencegifs)

Source: benjoyment
Photo Set

aintyousomthin:

izzyandlouie:

Jack is all smiles

See, he does smile sometimes.

(via britishdetectives)

Source: izzyandlouie
Photo

ancientfaces:

1912 Aviator Certificate

This is just fascinating! The aviator certificate of Harold Wesley Hall dated October 15th, 1912. If you click the link and enlarge the image you can read the text. [ Enlarged: Harold Wesley Hall Aviator ]

Source: ancientfaces.com
Photo

ancientfaces:

1940s Romania

These are some cool cats! Nicolae Vladescu with his friends taken in 1940 Romania. [ Original: Nicolae Vladescu 1940 Romania ]

Source: ancientfaces
Photo

ancientfaces:

The “Hat” Club

I love these hats! Francesco Cartisano & friends taken in 1913. [ Original: Francesco Cartisano & Friends ]

Source: ancientfaces.com
Photo

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

(via booksandhotchocolate)

Source: mimswriter
Photo
Photo